in season: late-fall

👨‍🌾 + 🥬 = 😍
All junzi vegetables are hand-selected by our local suppliers and delivered fresh every morning.
Enjoy our fall/winter seasonal pickled vegetables and stir-fries, inspired by Northern Chinese staples:

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long beans


长豆角

Chinese long beans, sometimes called yard-long beans, grow up to two and a half feet long and are harvested when they reach their maximum length for maximum sweetness. We blanch ours and dress it in a sesame smoked chive dressing.

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sweet potato
地瓜

Sweet potato translates in Chinese directly to “barbarian yam,” which is a nod to the Western import of the vegetable. It's shredded and wok-fried with white pepper, naturally sweet.

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green cabbage
圆白菜

Like others in cool climates, northern Chinese families cook a lot of cabbage, so different varieties of cabbage appear on our menu almost every season. In the fall, we stir fry green cabbage with soy sauce, aromatics, and fermented tofu.


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bings

Because rice historically hasn’t grown well in Northern China, wheat has been the focal grain. There are lots of variations of bings, at Junzi, we specialize in the Northern chun bing ( 春饼 ) .

A chun bing is a thin flour-pressed dough. Our bing dough is just flour and water, mixed in-house just right for deliciousness.The chun bing is traditionally eaten to celebrate the arrival of spring, but we like to eat it all year round, just in case.

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noodles

knife noodles ( 刀削面 )
Wide, wavy, rippled noodle with a variety of textures and thickness. A staple of Chinese food, the noodle originates from the Qin dynasty, the first imperial dynasty of China.

spring noodles ( 阳春面 )
Spring noodles originate from the basin of the longest river in Asia, the Yangtze river. The noodles are thinner, and chewier and are most often eaten with a lot of vegetables and scallions. We’ve named them spring noodles in homage of the seasons they’re most often eaten in.


noodle sauces

  jaja  Jaja is our take on “zhajiang noodles,” or fried sauce noodles—perhaps the most representative dish of Beijing. Fermented black beans and soy bean paste are mixed and fried in ginger scallion oil until fragrant, then blended into a paste.

jaja
Jaja is our take on “zhajiang noodles,” or fried sauce noodles—perhaps the most representative dish of Beijing. Fermented black beans and soy bean paste are mixed and fried in ginger scallion oil until fragrant, then blended into a paste.

  tomato egg  Tomatoes stir-fried with egg is probably the one dish most representative of Chinese homestyle cooking. Our version also has ginger and scallions for a little sweet and sour flavor.

tomato egg
Tomatoes stir-fried with egg is probably the one dish most representative of Chinese homestyle cooking. Our version also has ginger and scallions for a little sweet and sour flavor.

  furu sesame  Our most popular sauce, made from fermented tofu, sesame paste, soy sauce, and vinegar. It’s creamy, intense, funky.

furu sesame
Our most popular sauce, made from fermented tofu, sesame paste, soy sauce, and vinegar. It’s creamy, intense, funky.


bing sauces

  sweet bei  The most common chun bing sauce in Northern China is a Beijing-style sweet bean sauce made from fermented soy beans and wheat. This is often served with Peking duck and is the predecessor to the similar tasting hoisin.

sweet bei
The most common chun bing sauce in Northern China is a Beijing-style sweet bean sauce made from fermented soy beans and wheat. This is often served with Peking duck and is the predecessor to the similar tasting hoisin.

  garlic chili  Every northern Chinese restaurant boasts their proprietary blend of seasoning for braises, sauces and hot pots. We make ours in the style of mala hot pot seasoning with sichuan peppercorns and chilies, then mix it into fermented chilies with a hint of brown sugar. This sauce’s spice level is comparable to sriracha.

garlic chili
Every northern Chinese restaurant boasts their proprietary blend of seasoning for braises, sauces and hot pots. We make ours in the style of mala hot pot seasoning with sichuan peppercorns and chilies, then mix it into fermented chilies with a hint of brown sugar. This sauce’s spice level is comparable to sriracha.

  roasted sesame  Freshly roasted sesame seeds are blended with Chinese soy bean paste, rice vinegar, and soy sauce to make a creamy, nutty dressing.

roasted sesame
Freshly roasted sesame seeds are blended with Chinese soy bean paste, rice vinegar, and soy sauce to make a creamy, nutty dressing.


toppings available all season

  braised beef shank   A lot of unpopular, throwaway cuts in the US are premium cuts in China that have very specific, flavorful preparations. Beef shank, in particular, is a tender cut of beef from the leg. The muscle is marbled by tendon, which breaks down during our 3 hour braise with star anise, black cardamom, and cloves. It cools and rests overnight before it’s sliced thinly and served warm.

braised beef shank

A lot of unpopular, throwaway cuts in the US are premium cuts in China that have very specific, flavorful preparations. Beef shank, in particular, is a tender cut of beef from the leg. The muscle is marbled by tendon, which breaks down during our 3 hour braise with star anise, black cardamom, and cloves. It cools and rests overnight before it’s sliced thinly and served warm.

  braised pork hock   Pork hock is another vastly undervalued cut that’s a luxury in Northern China. Like the beef, the pork is braised gently on the bone in a sweeter liquid of brown sugar, bay leaves, ginger, and fennel. After it rests overnight, the pork is deboned, chopped up with the skin and served warm.

braised pork hock

Pork hock is another vastly undervalued cut that’s a luxury in Northern China. Like the beef, the pork is braised gently on the bone in a sweeter liquid of brown sugar, bay leaves, ginger, and fennel. After it rests overnight, the pork is deboned, chopped up with the skin and served warm.

  seared chicken thigh   The building blocks of most Northern Chinese chicken marinades are ginger, rice wine, and salt. We take that as a starting point and add galangal, garlic, cumin, and rice vinegar. The chicken thighs are then split and hard-seared on the griddle.

seared chicken thigh

The building blocks of most Northern Chinese chicken marinades are ginger, rice wine, and salt. We take that as a starting point and add galangal, garlic, cumin, and rice vinegar. The chicken thighs are then split and hard-seared on the griddle.

  king oyster mushrooms   At Junzi, we use king oyster mushrooms, a magnificently thick and buttery mushroom native to China. The mushrooms are traditionally toasted for color and stir-fried with carrots, soy sauce, and scallions. We’ve known for a while that the mushrooms are a favorite main for our regulars.

king oyster mushrooms

At Junzi, we use king oyster mushrooms, a magnificently thick and buttery mushroom native to China. The mushrooms are traditionally toasted for color and stir-fried with carrots, soy sauce, and scallions. We’ve known for a while that the mushrooms are a favorite main for our regulars.

  griddle-seared tofu   What's cool with our tofu is that we cook our tofu with tofu: at the last stage of grilling our tofu, we baste crisped tofu bits in a sauce made of soy, aromatics, and fermented tofu.

griddle-seared tofu

What's cool with our tofu is that we cook our tofu with tofu: at the last stage of grilling our tofu, we baste crisped tofu bits in a sauce made of soy, aromatics, and fermented tofu.

  pickled daikon   Daikon is a common Chinese radish that we pickle with carrots in rice vinegar for about a week to take the bite out. The acidity is a natural complement to the chun bing and noodle dishes.

pickled daikon

Daikon is a common Chinese radish that we pickle with carrots in rice vinegar for about a week to take the bite out. The acidity is a natural complement to the chun bing and noodle dishes.

  kale   Our kale is intentionally massaged so to wilt and become a silky, heartier leaf. It’s then dressed lightly with a garlicky oil we make of smoked Chinese chives.

kale

Our kale is intentionally massaged so to wilt and become a silky, heartier leaf. It’s then dressed lightly with a garlicky oil we make of smoked Chinese chives.

  chive ash   Chive ash is chive confit taken overboard; Chinese chives are gently cooked in oil for a couple hours until they almost burn. The garlicky flakes are dehydrated and used to give bings and bowls a bit of a smoky edge.

chive ash

Chive ash is chive confit taken overboard; Chinese chives are gently cooked in oil for a couple hours until they almost burn. The garlicky flakes are dehydrated and used to give bings and bowls a bit of a smoky edge.

  beansprout   There are two staples that are always eaten with chun bing. The first is matchstick potatoes and the second being bean sprouts stir-fried with Chinese chives with a little white pepper and rice vinegar. For most chun bings, we recommend having both as a base.

beansprout

There are two staples that are always eaten with chun bing. The first is matchstick potatoes and the second being bean sprouts stir-fried with Chinese chives with a little white pepper and rice vinegar. For most chun bings, we recommend having both as a base.

  cucumber   Our cucumbers are cured overnight for more of a crunch.

cucumber

Our cucumbers are cured overnight for more of a crunch.

  bean thread   Also known as glass noodles, these noodles are made with mung bean and tossed with chili flakes and sesame oil. Bean threads are an especially good textural addition well in chun bings.

bean thread

Also known as glass noodles, these noodles are made with mung bean and tossed with chili flakes and sesame oil. Bean threads are an especially good textural addition well in chun bings.

  shrimp salt   To give our bings and noodles the northern Chinese signature seafood flavor, we toast and grind up dehydrated shrimp shells to make shrimp salt. The natural salinity of the ocean gives the shrimps a salty quality, hence shrimp salt.

shrimp salt

To give our bings and noodles the northern Chinese signature seafood flavor, we toast and grind up dehydrated shrimp shells to make shrimp salt. The natural salinity of the ocean gives the shrimps a salty quality, hence shrimp salt.

  chili oil   Almost all Chinese restaurants either carry sriracha or make their chili oil. At Junzi, we make ours with Tianjin chilies, sichuan peppercorns, and smoky cayenne. This is the garnish we recommend to give meals a kick.

chili oil

Almost all Chinese restaurants either carry sriracha or make their chili oil. At Junzi, we make ours with Tianjin chilies, sichuan peppercorns, and smoky cayenne. This is the garnish we recommend to give meals a kick.