When I eat chun-bing, I think of college. When I was a student at Shenyang Normal University, chun-bing was our cram food of choice. Before tests, my three best friends and I would often buy them at a food cart just outside the north gate of campus and take them with us to our dorms or the library to eat during marathon pre-exam cram sessions. The school was huge, with three cafeterias, and there were plenty of food options, but popping out for a few chun-bing was always the quickest, tastiest choice, and my friends and I would eat them at least twice a week. If it wasn’t chun-bing, it was other kinds of fast food: mala tang, doe seuk mein, fried rice. We never ate alone; getting one thing for yourself was no fun, but if you got more than one, you could share. After I came to the U.S. for grad school, I started really missing Chinese food. That was when I began teaching myself simple dishes like stewed eggplant or scrambled eggs and tomatoes. At Fort Hayes University in Kansas it was hard to find Chinese ingredients, and sometimes my classmates and I would drive three hours to an Asian grocery store to buy Chinese chives. Now, at Junzi, I’m responsible for testing out new recipes and food concepts. Sharing the taste of home with friends has become my job.”

eva qiu zhang, assistant operation manager

eva qiu zhang, assistant operation manager

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